Iger de Disney demande à la Floride : « Est-ce que l’État veut que nous investissions plus… ou pas ? »

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Disney CEO Bob Iger has questioned whether Florida wants the company to invest more, employ more people, and pay more taxes, as the company’s ongoing legal feud with Governor Ron DeSantis continues. Disney had plans to invest over $17 billion in its Walt Disney World resort, creating 13,000 jobs, but the dispute began last year when Disney opposed a state parental rights bill. Florida stripped the company of power it held for 55 years to self-govern a special tax district that houses Walt Disney World and roughly 25,000 acres surrounding it, spawning dueling lawsuits in different courts. Disney’s suit alleges the state punished the company for its stance on the parental rights bill, thus violating Disney’s constitutional rights.

Iger also tried to dispel theories that Disney used litigation to preserve tax benefits for the entertainment giant. « There’s also a false narrative that we’ve been fighting to protect tax breaks as part of this, » he said. « But in fact, we’re the largest taxpayer in central Florida, paying over $1.1 billion in state and local taxes last year alone. And we pay more taxes, specifically more real estate taxes as a result of that special district, » he said. Disney’s district is one of six special districts approved prior to Florida’s adoption of its 1968 Constitution, and as a result is subject to less stringent rules.

DeSantis and the state legislature passed a series of laws over the last year that are at issue. One signed last Friday allows a board that the governor appointed to oversee the special tax district to retroactively cancel land development contracts approved by a prior Disney-controlled board. In response, DeSantis’ office told Yahoo Finance, « Disney’s latest move is yet another desperate attempt to maintain their special privileges and ignore the will of Floridians as expressed through their duly elected representatives. Disney should accept that it must live under the same rules as everyone else. »

The ongoing legal feud between Disney and Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has put the company’s plans to invest over $17 billion in its Walt Disney World resort and create 13,000 jobs in jeopardy. Disney’s suit alleges that the state punished the company for its stance on a parental rights bill, thus violating Disney’s constitutional rights. The company also tried to dispel theories that it used litigation to preserve tax benefits, stating that it is the largest taxpayer in central Florida, paying over $1.1 billion in state and local taxes last year alone. The dispute has led to dueling lawsuits in different courts, and DeSantis and the state legislature passed a series of laws over the last year that are at issue.

Disney’s district is one of six special districts approved prior to Florida’s adoption of its 1968 Constitution, and as a result is subject to less stringent rules. However, DeSantis’ office has stated that Disney should accept that it must live under the same rules as everyone else. The ongoing legal feud has put the company’s plans to invest and create jobs in jeopardy, and it remains to be seen how the dispute will be resolved.

Disney CEO questions Florida’s stance

Disney CEO Bob Iger has questioned whether Florida wants the company to invest more, employ more people, and pay more taxes, as the company’s ongoing legal feud with Governor Ron DeSantis continues. Disney had plans to invest over $17 billion in its Walt Disney World resort, creating 13,000 jobs, but the dispute began last year when Disney opposed a state parental rights bill. Florida stripped the company of power it held for 55 years to self-govern a special tax district that houses Walt Disney World and roughly 25,000 acres surrounding it, spawning dueling lawsuits in different courts.

Disney dispels tax benefits theory

Iger also tried to dispel theories that Disney used litigation to preserve tax benefits for the entertainment giant. « There’s also a false narrative that we’ve been fighting to protect tax breaks as part of this, » he said. « But in fact, we’re the largest taxpayer in central Florida, paying over $1.1 billion in state and local taxes last year alone. And we pay more taxes, specifically more real estate taxes as a result of that special district, » he said. Disney’s district is one of six special districts approved prior to Florida’s adoption of its 1968 Constitution, and as a result is subject to less stringent rules.

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